Archive for ‘bio-structuralism’

January 4, 2017

RETHINKING ARCHITECTURAL VOCABULARY | ARCHITECTURAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION | 2016

by yannis zavoleas

le-duc-anatomy

19-Cent. anatomy drawing compared with Viollet-le-Duc’s organic structure

Full title: Rethinking architectural vocabulary. Comprehensive design resolution via integrated BIM platforms

Author: Yannis Zavoleas

Keywords: Dynamic simulation; agent-based; BIM; form-finding

Abstract: This paper revisits established practices in architecture related to the instruments of production and addresses their profound influences upon the design outcome. Cartesian geometry has been used as a common reference to represent architectural elements, a view that has been applied into mainstream design software. The enduring ideologies assume the architectural product to be the result of aesthetic-driven operations supporting geometric regularity in defining elements’ shape and relative positioning. These approaches are compared to alternative ones described as form-finding, making extensive use of the computer’s power, often deviating from Cartesian basis, setting the ground for contemporary design research. In these cases, architectural elements are topological compounds undergoing generative operations. Architectural form is seen as an organic output emerging from interactions, shared functions, performed relationships and feedback loops, rather than ones typically offering full aesthetic control. It is noted that processes related to data inputs, agent management, simulation and recursive testing generally applied to facilitate tectonic resolution via integrated BIM platforms may equally describe those of early design decisions. Such a prospect may set the framing to update existing BIM software, so that the phases of analysis, ideation and conceptualisation are linked with those related to further development, engineering, manufacturing and completion.

Full paper download

Venue: Architectural Science Association 2016 official website

December 14, 2016

BIO-SHELTERS. DESIGNING REEF HABITATS AT THE SYDNEY HARBOUR | UNSW | 2016

by yannis zavoleas

Partners: University of New South Wales CoDe Society, University of New South Wales Biomedical Engineering, The University of Newcastle School of Architecture, Reef Design Lab, World Harbour Project, Macquarie University Biological Sciences

Concept: Yannis Zavoleas, Hank Haeusler, Andre Pereira, Beth Strain, Rebekah Araulo

Design: Yannis Zavoleas

Other contributors: Eliot Rosenberg, David Lennon, Alex Goad, Melanie Bishop, Vivian Cumbo, Maria Vozzo, James Gardiner

Description

Is it possible to design shelters where clams and other seashell organisms may feel more “at home,” as they will be protected, breed and thrive?

Sydney harbour has remarkable biodiversity, being one of the world’s healthiest ecosystems. Many of the species that live underwater are filter feeders, whose primary contribution in sustaining environmental balance is to clean the water by removing excess nutrients and pollutants. Due to increasing human population, pollution and climate change, the ocean is becoming a stressful environment for seashell organisms who live on rocky reef habitats. If those systems are continuously subjected to numerous stresses especially those related to human action, the strain is too much to endure and so they will perish.

The purpose of this workshop is first to study the conditions allowing reefs as marine ecosystems to survive; then, to design alternative shelters for the related species that will provide enough protection for them in order to breed and to thrive. Various digital and analogue tools used for dynamic simulation are employed to test reef structures as multi-agent systems with dynamic characteristics. Those systems are extremely versatile, agile and vital in maintaining environmental balance, meanwhile being very fragile, sensitive and threatened under the existing conditions. Key parameters influencing the viability of clam colonies are examined, leading to design propositions and prototypes about shelter units making compound reef structures. This study aims to reinforce the idea that applying dynamic simulation techniques is suitable for a wide range of design scenarios including our human settlements and the broader environment we live in.

bio-shelters-poster-compr

December 11, 2015

THE MODEL AND ITS OPERATIVE SIGNIFICANCE IN ARCHITECTURE | ARCHITECTURAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION | 2015

by yannis zavoleas

zavoleas simulation of densities 2015

Simulation model testing progressive accumulation of densities

Full title: The model and its operative significance in architecture. Objects driving evolution in design research

Author: Yannis Zavoleas

Keywords: Model; objectile; cybernetics; bio-structuralism

Abstract: This paper draws upon the distinction between aesthetic and operative characteristics of models set for exploration in scientific and architectural research. Specifically, it weaves a link between Cache’s concept of Objectile and architectural models appointed for studying design’s inner logic also in reference to models describing biological functions. The outcome of this synergy is models that respond dynamically to variable data inputs and designated tasks. However, even when models are primarily applied as highly intellectual devices rather than ones being merely visual, still they cannot be detached from the formal idioms data is presented, compared and implemented with, set in reference to the graphic languages and the communication means by which content of any kind enters the architectural scene. As a response to this apparent incongruity, this paper delves into the operational role of models in the architectural making seen not as aesthetic objects, but rather as testimonial instances of a dynamic system in a continuum of recursive exploration and testing, further prompting to understand design as an experimental process undergoing phases of evolution, and so evincing architecture’s profound affinities with science.

Full paper download

Venue: Architectural Science Association 2015 official website

October 26, 2014

BIO-STRUCTURALISM | 2014

by yannis zavoleas

Yannis Zavoleas, The University of Newcastle, Australia

Pro Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Research Creative Works | The University of Newcastle Australia | 2014 | Ongoing project

Research Background

An interest in biology has been present in architectural discourse since early modernism. An updating of the analogies between the two fields goes along with the introduction of computation in design research. In respect, the following cases approach different biological themes with the aid of advanced simulation and computation tools, aiming to show new paths for architectural research.

Research Contribution

Bio-structuralism is a term that addresses the benefits of biological structures as highly efficient modes of self organization and dynamic formation based on performative models, further explored under the digital scope. The proposed studies pertain to an area of interdisciplinary research developed under the biodigital theme, which has been on the main focus internationally for over one decade.